Ingredients

2/3 cup coconut flour
1 1/3 cup tapioca starch (cassava)
2 tsp baking powder
large pinch salt
4 eggs
2 cups canned full fat coconut milk mixed with 1/3 cup water
3 tsp coconut oil for the pancakes (a little more for cooking oil)

For the shrimp:
1 pound shrimp, shelled, with veins removed
2 teaspoons coconut oil
1 squeeze of fresh lime juice
red pepper flakes to taste (optional)

Directions

1. Combine all dry ingredients, then add the wet ingredients and mix well. 
2. Heat a little coconut oil and drip some batter in the pan, about 1 large laddle. Flip after lightly browned and continue cooking until the other side is brown. Continue this process until all of the pancakes are completed. Note: If making for children, you can add a little honey to the batter to make them taste sweeter.

Fill with your favorite ingredients, like shrimp and Columbian Cole Slaw; pulled pork with kim chee; or roast beef and avocado. The combinations are endless!

For the shrimp:
1. Sauté shrimp in oil and red pepper flakes (if desired). Season with limejuice.

For Columbian Coleslaw see other recipe video.

Recipe courtesy of Diana Rogers, Radiance Nutrition, 2012.

"I'm going to make some coconut crepes." says Diana Rodgers, Paleo Diet expert of Radiance Nutrition. "You can serve these as pancakes or you can use them as crepes for sandwiches." These crepes use tapioca starch and coconut flour in place of wheat flour so they are perfect for people on the paleo diet or with a gluten intolerance. "A lot of the time people new to paleo really, really miss the bread," says Rodgers, "so these are a good alternative for sandwich fillings."

Crepes are a type of very thin pancake usually served with some sort of filling, savory or sweet. They originated in Brittany, but are popular throughout the whole of France. In recent years, they have become more widespread in other Western countries as well, where they are often served on market or street stalls as a quick snack.

Typically, crepes are made with flour, eggs, milk, butter and a pinch of salt. If they are to have a sweet filling, they may also be slightly sweetened. Rodgers' crepes are a little different; as well as substituting the flour, she uses coconut milk instead of cow's milk and adds a little baking powder to help it rise. When she cooks the crepes, she melts some coconut oil in the pan in place of butter.

Tapioca starch and coconut flour are available in most health food stores or large supermarkets with a natural food section. Tapioca is a starch extracted from the cassava plant. The starch is often used as a thickening agent and is naturally gluten-free, but celiacs should check the packet because it is sometimes mixed with wheat flour.

Coconut flour is a healthy alternative to wheat flour; it is very high in fiber, a good source of protein and low in digestible carbohydrates, making it perfect for people on the paleo diet. It has a natural sweetness and "it's very dense, so you really only need a little tiny bit," says Rodgers.

Rodgers whisks the eggs before adding them to the dry ingredients and mixing everything together. She then slowly mixes in 2 cups of coconut milk and adds a little water at the end because the mix is a bit too thick; "Thicker versions of it can be used for pancakes. In order to make the crepes sometimes you have to thin it out just a little bit," she explains, "a runny pancake mix, that's what I am looking for."

Rodgers heats some coconut oil in a pan and pours in enough of the mixture to coat the bottom of the pan. "What I want you to do is just wait until you see the outer edges are cooked and that the inside, thinner part here doesn't look as raw and then you're ready to flip it," she explains.

For the filling Rodgers uses some shrimp sautéed with a little coconut oil, some red pepper flakes and a squeeze of limejuice. For greens she adds some Columbian cabbage, cilantro and mint slaw - "the perfect high protein, low carb, paleo lunch." But you are not limited to this - the best thing about these crepes is how versatile they are. Rodgers recommends pulled pork, leftover chicken or ham as an alternative source of protein with some sauerkraut or kimchi. Or you can eat them like pancakes, with a little maple syrup.

"These really satisfy that 'bready' craving that a lot of people new to the paleo diet really miss" says Rodgers. "Everyone I've made these for absolutely loves them. You just have to try it."

So now, I'm going to make some cocoa crepes. You can serve these as pancakes or you can use them as crepes for sandwiches. A lot of times, people new to Paleo really, really miss the bread and other things, and so these are a good alternative for sandwich fillings. So first, I'm going to start with some tapioca starch. I've got the package right here. You can see what it looks like in the grocery store. A lot of the natural food sections have it now.

And then, I'm adding coconut flour. Coconut flour comes in packages like this. It's very dense so you really only need a little tiny bit. It goes a long way. And the other dry ingredient I'm adding here is just a little bit of baking powder. Mix it up. It really doesn't matter what brand of coconut flour or tapioca starch you buy.

Next, I want you to add the eggs. These happen to be from my very own chickens. They're a little small right now, because my hens have just started laying. So the older they get the larger their eggs become. These are just the first few eggs from our flock of pastor chickens. Eggs from pastor chickens have a much higher omega 3 content, because the chickens are out eating bugs and grass and all kinds of wild things other than just grain all the time. The yolks tend to be a little deeper in color. And, of course, the fat content is much richer. And now, we can add the eggs. About two cups of coconut milk.

So now, I'm just going to mix this up. Thicker versions of it could be used for pancakes. In order to make the crepes , sometimes you have to thin it out just a little bit. So you just want to mix it just until all the ingredients are combined, not over mixing. This is looking a little bit thick to me, and so I'm just going to add a little extra water. Kind of a runny pancake mix, that's what I'm looking for. So this should work.

I've got just a little bit of coconut oil here. I'm going to melt this into the pan. It melts really quickly. In the summertime, in your kitchen, this is already going to be melted. At 76 degrees coconut oil melts. I'm hearing a little sizzle so I know it's ready. You can make these bigger, whatever size you like.

What I want you to do is just wait until you see that the outer edges are cooked, and that you see that the inside center part here doesn't look as raw, and then you're ready to flip it. Everyone I've made these for absolutely loves them. Sometimes, we eat them just like this with a little maple syrup, like pancakes. Or we use them for sandwiches, and we'll serve pulled pork inside, a little ham with some sauerkraut, some kimchi.

This really satisfies that bready craving that a lot of people new to the Paleo diet really miss. So in order to assemble the crepe sandwiches, just take one of the crepes, add a little protein. In this case, I have some shrimp, but I really, like I said before, pulled pork works really, really well. Any kind of meat, anything you've got, maybe some leftover chicken.

The shrimp, I just sauteed very quickly, in a pan with a little bit of coconut oil and added some red pepper flakes and a tiny bit of lime juice at the end. And here I'm adding this cabbage slaw with cilantro and mint. Sauerkraut would work equally well. I've done this with pulled pork and sauerkraut before. Or some avocado would also be really good in these, for a little bit of fat.

So here we've got the Colombian cabbage, cilantro, and mint slaw with some sauteed shrimp, and it is the perfect high protein, low carb, Paleo lunch. So I'm getting a little bit of spiciness from the slaw, lime juice. And the sweetness from the coconut flour is really, really nice and light in the crepe, and it's just perfect. Really refreshing. You just have to try it. It's really, really great.

Gluten Free Crepe
Categories :,