Ingredients

Fresh herbs and young greens, a handful collectively per person - (the point is to choose what’s local, which in New England is still small and tender:  parsley, chives, cilantro, chervil baby lettuces, arugula.)
thick slice of hearty bread (i.e. levain)
1 large egg (duck or regular)
salt
1 teaspoon vinegar
2 ounces goat cheese
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
salt & pepper to taste
 

Directions

1. Start with fresh herbs and young greens, a handful collectively per person - the point is to choose what’s local, which in New England is still small and tender:  parsley, chives, cilantro, chervil (if you’re lucky) baby lettuces, arugula.
2. Thickly slice a piece of the hearty bread and toast it.
3. While the bread is toasting, poach the egg.  If you can, this is the moment you should bring your laptop to the kitchen counter and watch Amelia O’Reilly on the Taste of the Times text demonstrate the perfect way to poach an egg.   Alternatively, fill a skillet with an inch and a half of water, and bring it to a low simmer.   Sprinkle in some salt and a half-teaspoon or so of vinegar into the water.  Swirl the water into a gentle whirlpool.  Crack the egg first into a teacup.  Hold the teacup at the top of the simmering water, so a small bit of water runs into the cup, beginning the process of cooking the white.  Hold it for a couple of seconds, and then pour the whole egg into the circling, simmering water.
4. Spread the toast with a soft, preferably local – (The Market uses Valley View Chevre from Topsfield, Ma.) - goat cheese.  Salt and pepper the goat cheese liberally.
5. To assemble the salad, put all the greens in a bowl.  Sprinkle first with lemon juice, then salt and pepper, and toss with your hands.  Then drizzle olive oil over it all and toss again.
6. To arrange the dish:  for each person put a poached egg onto the plate.  Lay the goat cheese beside it, and “strew” the salad around all.  

Recipe courtesy of Amelia O’Reilly and Nico Monday, 2010.
 

“The best-tasting food is organically and locally grown and harvested in ways that are ecologically sound by people who are taking care of the land for future generations.”  To Alice Waters, these words are gospel. In 1971, in Berkeley, California, Alice Waters founded Chez Panisse, which has flourished as the sanctum sanctorum of the organic, sustainable, seasonal foods movement.  Amelia O’Reilly and Nico Monday, both chefs at this treasured force in American cuisine, have learned the lessons of making food using local and fresh ingredients and this is one of their favorite recipes, as well as one of Alice Water’s herself.
 

Poached Duck Egg, Herb Sa
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